Saturday, December 13, 2014

Sepia Saturday #258: 'Finely Wrought': Ireland

This week for Sepia Saturday we have been asked to look at the inspiration image and "forget the foreground and look into the background", in order to choose an element on which to base our own individual post. Since there is some wrought iron fencing in the image, for my contribution I have chosen 'wrought iron'. Be sure to stop by the Sepia Saturday blog to see how others have been inspired by the image, and perhaps you'll be inspired too.

When I looked through my photographs I was surprised to see just how many lovely incarnations of wrought iron you might find around Dublin, as well further afield in Ireland. Although the images are in colour rather than sepia, they feature historical wrought iron, so to speak. Here are a few of my favourites:

The old sign on the Irish Times building has a lovely bit of wrought iron supporting the clock on the column.
Tara Street, Dublin City, County Dublin.
The Garden of Remembrance is ringed round with wrought iron fencing,
painted in blue and gold, and replete with Irish symbols.
Parnell Square, Dublin.
This beautiful and tall wrought iron gate leads out of the gardens of Farmleigh House, Phoenix Park, Dublin.
Although both the convent and the school closed in 1999 — after educating young women for 247 years —
the wrought iron gates of the old Loreto Abbey remain.
Rathfarnham, County Dublin. 
Many Georgian Period houses feature wrought iron stair rails, balconettes and fencing, and
many of these still have little wrought iron boot scrapers on the landings.
Upper Mount Street, Dublin City, County Dublin.
One of those wrought iron boot scrapers,
essential in the 18th, 19th and early 20th century
for removing 'the street' from your feet.
The interior wrought iron gates at O'Connell's Tomb,
The Prospect Cemetery at Glasnevin,
Dublin City, County Dublin.
Rusted by the sea air, this wrought iron fence surrounds the grave of Catherine O'Malley.
Murrisk Abbey Cemetery, Clew Bay, Murrisk, County Mayo.
In many cemeteries throughout Ireland you will find similarly 'gated' graves.
Inside Murrisk Abbey (founded in 1457 by Hugh O'Malley),
a locked wrought iron gate.
Clew Bay, Murrisk, County Mayo.
The wrought iron gate of Marsh's Library (established 1795)
St. Patrick's Close, Dublin City, County Dublin.
The wrought iron fence separating beach from boardwalk,
Bray, County Wicklow.
One of the beautiful wrought iron lamp posts that you will find in Dublin.
In the background is St. Stephen's Anglican Church, popularly known as the Peppermill Church.
The Ha'penny Bridge (opened 1816), probably the most famous span of wrought iron in Ireland.
Dublin City, County Dublin.

©irisheyesjgg2014.

12 comments:

  1. I like both the wrought iron examples and your photos of them.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks very much for your comment, Postcardy!

      Cheers!
      Jennifer

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  2. It's interesting to see wrought iron that has stood the test of time. Britain lost a lot of gates and fences as scrap metal during WWII. You can still see walls where holes indicate where railings used to be. I'm pleased to say that lately more and more new fences and gates are appearing.
    You have found many fine examples, especially the clock support and the Dublin lamp post.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks very much for your comments, Bob. It is interesting to see those which have stood the test of time. One of my favourite wrought iron works outside of Ireland is the Canada Gate at Green Park, London. It is lovely to see such works being erected.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

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  3. A very fine tour! Ornamental ironwork is a lost art that deserves to be preserved. Like Bob I was drawn to lamppost perhaps because it is ordinarily such an unadorned utility light.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks very much for your comments, Mike. I agree with you Mike, it is a lost art that deserves to be preserved. The lampposts are my favourite; embellished with shamrocks, they always bring a smile to my face.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

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  4. Replies
    1. Thanks very much for your comment, Alan. You've coined the perfect phrase for the iron work: 'Poetry in wrought iron'.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      Delete
  5. Ireland has a plethora of beautiful iron work, and your photos illustrate the diversity of its use. Oh to be in Ireland :)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks very much for your comments, Pauline. Ireland does indeed have a plethora of beautiful iron work. Long may they preserve it!

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

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  6. These are beautiful. I like the shamrock lamppost and the abbey ones the best. Catherine.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks very much for your comments, Catherine. I'm with you; I like those as well.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      Delete

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