Saturday, April 6, 2013

Sepia Saturday #171: Castles, Ruins, and other edifices of antiquity

When I saw the inspirational image for Sepia Saturday #171, I was thrilled. Ever since our father and mother guided my brother and me, as we climbed through our very first Irish ruins, I have been hooked on old castles, as well as all manner of ruins, including churches, abbeys, stone huts and round towers.

There is a tactility with ruins; the stone seems to invite touch. When you graze your hand against the ancient stone out of which these buildings are crafted, it seems as though there is a cosmic connection with those who touched the same stone way back in time.

Over the years I have shot many photographs of castles and ruins in Ireland; here are a dozen of my favourite images. Be sure to stop by Alan and Kat's blog Sepia Saturday, and perhaps you'll be inspired too.

Tintern De Voto Abbey, County Wexford.
Not the Tintern Abbey of Wordsworth's poem, but nonetheless a place where we can
"see into the life of things".
For some inexplicable reason I have always felt a very strong connection to this place.
(Founded in 1200 by William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, 1st Lord of Leinster).
The Rock of Cashel, County Tipperary.
The round tower is the oldest building on the site, dating to 1100.
Castle Dunguaire, a 16th century 'tower house' on the shores of Galway Bay, County Galway.
I've no idea who the happy couple are.
The 13th century Keep of Geraldine Castle which replaced a castle built by Maurice Fitzgerald in 1176.
The castle was the principal residence of the Kildare branch of the Geraldines, one of whom was
'Silken' Thomas Fitzgerald who fortified the castle against the English in 1534.
The castle was captured and dismantled in 1647.
Maynooth, County Kildare.
Swords Castle is right in the middle of downtown Swords, County Dublin,  and dates to the 13th century.
Gormanston Castle, County Meath
The seat of the Preston family, the Viscount Gormanston, from the 14th century until the late 1940s
when it was sold to the Franciscan Order of Friars.
The current castle was built in the 18th century (1786) on the site of an earlier castle.
It is now a co-ed college run by the Franciscans.
Hoare Abbey, County Tipperary.
Occupied from the 13th century (1270),
it stands just over the wall  from the Rock of Cashel.
The main Keep of Athlone Castle at the very centre of the castle.
Built on the River Shannon in the 13th century (1210), it is officially in Westmeath,
but is on the border between County Westmeath and County Roscommon.
Not exactly a castle I realize, but nonetheless interesting given that it is an Iron Age stone hut
just down the hill from the passage tomb at Newgrange, County Meath.
St. Kevin's Church and Kitchen,
part of the Monastic Settlement at Glendalough, County Wicklow.
The settlement dates to the 6th century. 
St. Reefert's Church, Upper lake, Glendalough, County Wicklow dates to the 11th century.
A last look before departing the 'ruined' neighbourhood of
the Monastic Settlement at Glendalough, County Wicklow.
Click on photographs to view larger version.
All Photographs Copyright©irisheyesjg2008-2013.

14 comments:

  1. A fantastic collection of photos.

    All the wonderful posts this week are making me even more impatient to visit UK.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sharon,

      Thanks very much much for your comments! It's nice to hear from you. I hope you do take the opportunity to visit the UK and Ireland. Both have some extraordinary sights especially for those who love castles.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      Delete
  2. What a marvellous castle collection from Ireland. Thank you for introducing me to these historic buildings.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sue,

      Thank you for your comments! Glad to make the introduction.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      Delete
  3. I did a whole month of castles in last year's A-Z Challenge and include Dunluce from Ireland. You have a super collection of castle photos; I'm quite envious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Bob,

      Thank you for your lovely comments! I really appreciate them. Dunluce is incredible, as you know. I haven't been there since I was a child, but somewhere in my dad's photo archive there are some shots of it. I'd love to be there sometime when a great storm is whipping up the sea.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      Delete
  4. Amazing, every one! I must take another trip to Ireland. There's much more to uncover.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Colleen,

      Thank you for your comments! I always appreciate hearing from you. I have to agree with you they are amazing structures. As you know Cashel is extraordinary. The very first time we went there my elder brother wandered off and we 'found' him when he called down to us from way above our heads.
      He had climbed up into one of the principal parts and was walking through a sort of stone hallway.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      Delete
  5. Beautiful! I was surprised by the stone roofs at St. Kevin's Church.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kathy,

      Thanks very for your comments! It is amazing that they were able to craft such roofs, and that those roofs still stand.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      Delete
  6. Lovely photos Jennifer, and plenty to add to my must-see list (and I thought I'd seen a lot of Ireland!). I'm glad you included Glendalough- I saw it first in winter with ice and frost...it was spectacular and holds a special place in my heart.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Pauleen,

      Thank you for your comments. As always they are much appreciated. One of the things I most love about Ireland is that there always something new to see. I've never seen Glendalough in the winter time, so I'll have to add that to my list. As I go through my parents' photo collection, I've discovered many images of them with friends at Glendalough when they were courting, something they had never mentioned. They are lovely to see.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      Delete
  7. Wonderful images, there is beauty in ruins as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Teresa,

      Thanks very much for your comments. I completely agree, there certainly is a beauty in ruins.

      Cheers,
      Jennifer

      Delete

Comments on this blog are always deeply appreciated; however, in the spirit of true collegiality, I ask that you do not write something you could not say to me in person.

There is a proliferation of SPAM on this blog, so unfortunately comments moderation must be in operation.

Any comments that are mean-spirited, include URLs which are not connected to the post topic, contain misinformation, or in any way resemble advertising, will be removed. Anonymous comments which do not bear the name of the person commenting within the body of the comment, or are clearly generated from fake Google or Blogger accounts, will also be deleted.

Cheers, Jennifer

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...